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10 Free Math Games for Teachers

  
  
  

Math GamesMath games for teachers are a fun way to entertain your mathematical geniuses and inspire the students who are lagging behind. If you're looking for new ways to inspire your students to find the joy in fractions, decimals, and algebraic equations - look no further. Here are 10 FREE math games that can help you reinforce your current lesson plans, allow your students some computer time, and give them a break - of sorts.

10 Free Math Games for Teachers


  1. Add Like Mad. This game gives students a target number and a huge board of number tiles. Students have to click the numbers in order to Add Like Mad until the numbers they have selected add up to the target number.

  2. Aquarium Fish. Little ones will enjoy this counting game. Count the Aquarium Fish and select the number that reflects the accurate total. At the end of the game, the computer tells you how many attempts it took to get the answer right, which can be a helpful assessment for teachers.

  3. Math Man. The game Math Man is based on Pac Man. Need we say more? First Math Man has to eat the ?, then he has to eat the ghost that solves the math equation. You can use it to reinforce multiplication, division, and rounding numbers.

  4. Digit Drop. Students practice addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division in Digit Drop. Simply drop the correct number from a big number batch to finish the equation. Students can practice, play, and select their level.

  5. Calc. Students do the calculation in their heads and type the correct answer. The better they do, the faster and harder it gets. Your geniuses can even start at the "genius" level.

  6. Counting Money. This is one of the best games for teaching students how to count money, make change, and do money-based word problems. Money Counting Basic states a specific dollar amount and students click on the money drawer to put the appropriate amount of change in the "hand."

  7. Genius Defender. Holy moly. Where was Genius Defender when we were learning to add and subtract decimals? Cute little men and women defend their fort as the "invaders" - holding decimal problems - mount an attack. When students type in the correct answer to an attacker's decimal problem, the defenders eliminate him. The goal is to answer all equation attackers accurately before they invade the fort. It's addictive.

  8. WMD2. Weapons of Maths Destruction involves shooting targets and tanks to receive a math equation. Easy equations deal with simple addition and subtraction skills. Harder ones move into the algebraic realm.

  9. More or Less? Help students make comparisons by determining whether there are More or Less of certain objects in the squares. By selecting the least populated, most populated, or evenly populated squares, students learn to compare quantities.

  10. Space Match Geo. Space Match Geo is great for beginning geometry students, helping them learn lines, rays, acute angles, etc. by playing a memory game. They flip over the icons to reveal a shape or a vocabulary term and have to match them appropriately.

These 10 math games for teachers are just a sampling of all that MathNook has to offer. They can be used to reward students who are doing well, as a fun way to work with students who are struggling with certain concepts, or as a Friday Fun Day. However, we do recommend that students use head phones so you can remain sane during the learning process.

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