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10 Summer Reading Activities for Struggling Readers

  
  
  

struggling readersLately our blog topics have been targeting parents and there’s a reason for it: Summer is only a few weeks away. Like most teachers, we’re looking forward to the warm weather and a new schedule, but our students—particularly our struggling readers—are never far from our minds. Will the progress these students made over the last year stagnate in the next three months when we’re not there to coach and encourage them? Did we successfully develop their intrinsic motivation to read? Will parents pick up where we left off? Since you can’t be there over the summer, we’re passing along 10 summer reading activities for struggling readers.

 

10 Summer Reading Activities for Struggling Readers

  1. If you’re going on a trip this summer, read about your destination. While you’re on the trip, keep a record of the things you saw.
  1. Compile a checklist of things you want to do over the summer. Do you want to build something? See something? Go somewhere? Find books or documentary films related to your list.
  2. Sign up for a summer activity—this could be an art class, a sports team, a dance class, guitar lessons, whatever. Now find books and magazines related to it.
  3. Get a library card. Parents: Treat this as an honorable occasion and a rite of passage.
  4. Write a letter to your favorite author. Don’t be surprised when they write you back.
  5. Start a summer blog and keep your friends and teachers updated on what you are doing. There are dozens of blogging platforms to choose from and most of them are free. Here are a few free blogging platforms you might check out: Blogger, WordPress.com, Blog.com, or even TypePad Micro.
  6. Write a digital story using a free website called Storybird. Struggling readers and writers are often intimidated by blank screens. Digital storytelling allows users to choose their images first; then they write, tailoring their story to fit the images.
  7. Watch foreign films and read our blog to find out why you should.
  8. Subscribe to an online blog that writes about topics that interest you. Get involved in the conversation by commenting on the posts.
  9. Make a deal with your parents: If they buy something on Amazon.com, you get to write a product review for it.


    If you’re looking for more ways to engage struggling readers, check out two of our recent blogs, 5 Reading Strategies you can share with your students' parents and Teaching Reading Means Teaching Students to LOVE Reading.

    Photo credit: KOMU news.

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