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10 Summer Activities for Kids Who Use the B-Word

  
  
  

 summer activities for kids

We strongly dislike the B-Word (boring!) and those of us with kids find it ringing in our ears during the summer. As anti-boredom fighters and educational advocates, we’d like to offer 10 summer activities for kids. Not only will they keep students entertained, they’ll also keep them from taking a ride down the summer slide. Please feel free to add any suggestions to our list!

10 Summer Activities for Kids Who Use the B-Word

  1. Plant a garden and keep a journal documenting each plant’s growth. If you are short on space, plant in containers.

  2. Here’s an idea for parents: If your children want to watch TV—even though the weather is beautiful!—cut them a deal: They can watch a movie, but they have to watch it with the sound off and the closed captioning on.

  3. Use iPadio to create a weekly podcast updating friends and family on your summer adventures. iPadio is a free app that allows you to record up to 60 minutes of high quality audio simply by using your cell phone (or landline). Once you’ve recorded your message, you can upload it to Facebook or email it to your friends and family.

  4. Here’s an idea for teachers: Hand out postcards (stamped and addressed) so that your students can tell you about their summer.

  5. Find a picture book without words and write your own story. Not sure where to start? Try The Grey Lady and the Strawberry Snatcher by Molly Bang. It’s a classic.

  6. Adopt a soldier through websites like, Adopt a US Soldier or Soldier’s Angels. Just remember that when you sign up, you’re making a commitment to regularly send cards and care packages. If you’re unsure what you should say, check out these sample letters for ideas. Keep in mind that packages don’t have to be expensive and if you’re stumped on what to get for your adopted hero, just ask; you can also refer to the website for a list of the most-requested items.

  7. Become a change agent. We’ve always believed that young people have the power to lead even if they don’t know it themselves. Are you passionate about animals? The environment? Does texting-and-driving bother you? Stop by DoSomething.org, a website for young people who want to help make the world a better place, but don’t know exactly where to start.

  8. Become a Geocacher. If you’ve never heard of it, geocaching is a free real-world outdoor treasure hunt. Players try to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, using a smartphone or GPS and can then share their experiences online. To learn more about it, stop by Geocaching.com.

  9. Design an alternative book cover for your favorite book, or try writing a short sequel or alternative ending to the book instead.

  10. If you’re looking for a list of books to read over the summer, but don’t know where to start, download Reading Rocket’s free guide to summer reading.

Comments

Hey, 
 
Thanks for this useful post. You must be a very good parent. I'll love to know more about kids activities so that my kids get indulge in those activities because they love to do so not instead of forcefully busy with those activities.
Posted @ Friday, March 07, 2014 1:26 AM by Patrick
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