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3 Sites to Help Students Move from Classroom to Career

  
  
  

Many of us have a clear sense of what we want to be—or more specifically, what we want to do for a living—from the moment we pop out of the womb. Whether or not it’s true, I know plenty of teachers who claim they knew they were going be educators while they were still walking around in diapers. Others of us, this writer included, didn’t find our niche or career path until well into adulthood.

While we do believe that kids should be kids, we would also argue that we have a responsibility to guide our students, help them hone their talents and move towards a fulfilling future. To help your students begin assessing their passions and career interests, we’d like to share three of our favorite resources with you.  

3 Sites to Help Students Move from Classroom to Career

icouldicould probably articulates its mission better than I can: “icould is about inspiration, encouragement and discovery. The idea is to help you make the most of your potential and talent by showing how others have used theirs.”

To pique your students’ interest, icould has compiled an impressive collection of video interviews with working professionals—anyone from laboratory technicians, engineers and speech therapists to music video directors, lighting cameramen and stewards.

Teachers will also find articles, classroom resources and a database of career-related articles on the site.

your free career testUnlike other career tests, Your Free Career Test is short (52 questions) and isn’t based on psychological theories. It simply asks students questions that relate to career categories; then it uses an algorithm to match their responses to careers. Upon completion, your students will receive an assessment that assigns them to a career category, recommends courses and offers a bulleted list of example careers.

career thoughtsIn addition to interview and resume tips and career planning advice, you’ll also find a “Jobs For People Who…,” section that matches career options to your students’ interests. Also worth checking out is the “Do What You Love!” section where you’ll find a collection of interviews with anyone from animal communicators, astronauts and filmmakers to actors, musicians and LEGO master builders.

 

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