MAT Blog

The 5 Most Popular Posts on Marygrove MAT in March

Posted by Marygrove MAT on Apr 6, 2013 6:00:00 AM

Marygrove CollegeIt’s still a little brisk here in Detroit, but we’re enjoying the spring sunshine April has brought us. Before we get too far into the month though, we thought we’d look back on five of the most popular blogs from March. Enjoy.

Reading Strategies that Transcend the Classroom
If the classroom is truly the training ground for life, it only makes sense that we would use reading strategies that mimic the way we read outside of the classroom, doesn’t it? In this blog, we share five of Rachel McCormack’s and Susan Lee Pasquarelli’s strategies that will help you make reading transcend the classroom.

Come on now, help a substitute teacher out
We thought we might have exhausted all things “classroom management,” but then we came across a simple classroom management strategy—one to help out the substitute teachers who cover for us when we can’t be there!

Are you providing effective feedback? Or are students ignoring you?
Have you ever wondered why you bothered to spend an hour responding to one of your student’s essays only to have them turn in a “revision” that was essentially the same essay you saw the first time around?  Why does this happen? And more importantly, how can teachers prevent this from happening? 

PlagTracker: a free plagiarism detector
Students plagiarize for a variety of reasons (many of them innocuous, many not). To help deter plagiarism, you might check out a new website we came across called PlagTracker. We suggest sharing it with your students.

Do your students have “the moves” to write a strong thesis statement?
We came across another cool website called Thesis Builder. Essentially it allows users to plug in a topic, an opinion on the topic, two supporting arguments and a counter argument. From this, Thesis Builder will generate a sketchy, but nonetheless discussion-worthy thesis statement. We think this would be a useful teaching tool.

Happy spring!!

 

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Tags: Marygrove MAT, Master in the Art of Teaching Degree, MAT Program, Marygrove College Master's degree in teaching, Marygrove College Master in the Art of Teaching, Marygrove Master in the Art of Teaching, best of the month

Questions about online education? You're not alone!

Posted by Marygrove MAT on Mar 27, 2013 9:55:00 AM

Earning a degree from a college or university is a life-changing accomplishment. But until relatively recently, pursuing higher education was much less possible for non-traditional students: parents, working adults and those who happened to live in areas where commuting to a campus just wasn’t feasible.

The proliferation of Internet access and affordable technology has changed all that and we’re proud to say that Marygrove College was at the forefront of that movement when it began in the early 1990s.

Although online and distance learning programs have been around for more than two decades, many students still have questions about it:

What does the online learning experience look like? How does it work? How does it compare to the traditional classroom experience? Am I tech-savvy enough to learn through an online program?

We’d like to answer these questions and do it in an easily-digestible way—through an infographic that you can take with you, share and repost at your leisure. Check it out!

Known for excellence in teaching since 1905, Marygrove College has been offering the convenience of online MAT classes and the flexibility of its Master in the Art of Teaching (MAT) online degree program since 1990. Marygrove's MAT degree provides teachers with the opportunity to link the latest developments in educational research to their own teaching practice. The MAT degree program is designed to empower teachers by focusing on the knowledge and skills required to deliver effective instruction to diverse learners from preschool through high school, including those with special needs.

 

Learn more about our online Master's Degree Program

Tags: Marygrove MAT, Master in the Art of Teaching Degree, MAT Program, Marygrove College Master's degree in teaching, Marygrove College Master in the Art of Teaching, enroll in the Marygrove MAT program, Marygrove Master in the Art of Teaching, infographic

Franksgiving? Craneberries? Some fun holiday trivia to share.

Posted by Colleen Cadieux on Nov 15, 2011 3:16:00 PM

Marygrove MAT offers trivia for teachers to share with their K-12 students.In honor of the Thanksgiving holiday, take an opportunity over the next week to impress your students with Thanksgiving trivia, and enjoy being the “know-it-all” at your Thanksgiving table!

In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln designated the last Thursday in November as a national day of thanksgiving. However, in 1939, after a request from the National Retail Dry Goods Association, President Franklin Roosevelt decreed that the holiday should always be celebrated on the fourth Thursday of the month (and never the occasional fifth, as occurred in 1939) in order to extend the holiday shopping season by a week. The decision sparked great controversy, some even referred to it as “Franksgiving,” and was still unresolved two years later, when the House of Representatives passed a resolution making the last Thursday in November a legal national holiday. The Senate amended the resolution, setting the date as the fourth Thursday, and the House eventually agreed.

Domesticated turkeys (the type eaten on Thanksgiving) cannot fly, and their pace is limited to a slow walk. Female domestic turkeys, which are typically smaller and lighter than males, can move somewhat faster. Wild turkeys, on the other hand, are much smaller and more agile. They can reach speeds of up to 20-25 miles per hour on the ground and fly for short distances at speeds approaching 55 miles per hour. They also have better eyesight and hearing than their domestic counterparts.

•According to the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers' Association, one of the country's oldest farmers' organizations, Native Americans used cranberries in a variety of foods, including "pemmican" (a nourishing, high-protein combination of crushed berries, dried deer meat and melted fat). They also used it as a medicine to treat arrow punctures and other wounds and as a dye for fabric. The Pilgrims adopted these uses for the fruit and gave it a name—"craneberry"—because its drooping pink blossoms in the spring reminded them of a crane.

•The American tradition of college football on Thanksgiving is pretty much as old as the sport itself. The newly formed American Intercollegiate Football Association held its first championship game on Thanksgiving Day in 1876. At the time, the sport resembled something between rugby and what we think of as football today. By the 1890s, more than 5,000 club, college and high school football games were taking place on Thanksgiving, and championship match-ups between schools like Princeton and Yale could draw up to 40,000 fans. The NFL took up the tradition in 1934, when the Detroit Lions played the Chicago Bears at the University of Detroit stadium in front of 26,000 fans. Since then, the Lions game on Thanksgiving has become an annual event, taking place every year except during the World War II years (1939–1944). For more fun facts, visit history.com, a treasure trove of educational information.*

From the entire faculty and staff of the Marygrove College Master in the Art of Teaching Program, we wish you a blessed Thanksgiving with your family and friends.

*The preceding text is culled from History.com, Nov.14, 2011.

 

Tags: Marygrove MAT, Marygrove College Master's degree in teaching, teachers, K-12 students, trivia

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