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5 Websites to Help You Enhance Your Science Curriculum

Posted by Marygrove MAT on Sep 25, 2014 11:05:07 AM

science_curriculum

There’s no doubt about it, the Web is brimming with resources to help teachers enhance their science curriculum. But sorting through the clutter and finding the best websites, can be tedious and time consuming. That’s why I’d like to share five science websites that I personally check on a regular basis.

Some of these sites tackle the “serious” side of science; others may push students to rethink their presuppositions about technology, or simply answer wild and wacky questions they have about science.

5 Websites to Help You Enhance Your Science Curriculum

science curriculumI’d probably file How Stuff Works under the wild-and-wacky umbrella. Ever wonder why octopus blood is blue, how NASCAR got its start, or why men have nipples? No problem, the writers, editors, podcasters, and video hosts of How Stuff Works have the answers.

science curriculumLow-Tech Magazine is a website run by Kris De Decker and Deva Lee, a creative duo who write about often-forgotten knowledge and technologies with the idea that not every problem necessitates a high-tech solution.

On Low-Tech, students will find thought-provoking articles about sustainable energy solutions: How to generate power directly from the water tap; why it makes more sense to heat your clothes and not your home; how to heat cities without fossil fuels; and countless other articles that will pique your students’ interest and enhance your science curriculum.
science curriculum
Science Friday began over two decades ago as a radio show, but since then, they’ve developed into a heck of a lot more. Here, you’ll find award-winning videos and articles covering everything from octopus camouflage to cooking on Mars.

science curriculumNova is the highest rated science series on television; it’s also the most watched documentary series on public television. To supplement their television programming, Nova created a website to host their ever-expanding library of science shows, articles and videos that cover anything from Tsunamis and Sasquatch, to planet hunting and stabilizing vaccines with silk.

science curriculumInstructables is a one-stop shop for any do-it-yourself project you can—and can’t—think of. All of the tutorials on the site are user-created, which gives students the opportunity to not only try building other users’ projects, but also take a shot at helping others build their projects.

Photo credit: Amy Loves Yah / Foter / CC BY

 

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Tags: STEM careers, STEM curriculum, science teachers, science curriculum, science and engineering education

Travel Our Solar System With This Interactive Infographic

Posted by Ryan O'Rourke on Apr 24, 2014 9:57:00 AM

Space Race is an animated infographic that takes users on a scrolling adventure that begins on Earth and ends at the edge of the solar system, some 21 billion kilometers away. Comprehending the enormity of our solar system is difficult, but Space Race certainly helps put it in perspective.

Space Race

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Tags: STEM careers, STEM jobs, STEM curriculum, apps for educators, apps for teachers, science curriculum, science and engineering education

Science Buddies Helps Students Find Engaging Science Experiments

Posted by Marygrove MAT on Dec 26, 2013 6:00:00 AM

science experimentsDeciding on a science experiment is a little bit like settling on a research paper topic for many of our students. They often need a little guidance to figure out what truly interests them.

If this sounds too familiar, direct your students to Science Buddies, a website with over 1,000 experiment ideas that cover more than 30 different areas of science.

So that your students don’t have to rifle through their entire database of projects, Science Buddies set up a topic selection wizard, a survey quiz that asks users questions about their interests, grade, and reading comprehension level. Based on these answers, the topic selection wizard will find a collection of science experiment ideas that correspond to users’ interests and abilities.

There are a few other noteworthy things you’ll find on Science Buddies:

The Ask an Expert Forum
This is a place where students can go to find answers to science questions they can’t find elsewhere. If students have specific questions about their science fair project, Science Buddies’ team of volunteer scientists can help. While these experts won't do the work for students, they will make suggestions, offer guidance, and help students troubleshoot.

Explore Careers in Earth and Physical Science

Want to know more about careers in earth and physical sciences? Browse through detailed information on over 100 careers to discover what scientists really do and what it takes to prepare for these careers. Each career profile provides basic career information such as salary, job outlook, degree requirements, etc. Science Buddies has also included videos featuring interviews with real scientists or on-the-job profiles.

 

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Tags: STEM careers, STEM jobs, STEM curriculum, science experiments, science curriculum, science and engineering education

STEM of the Living Dead: 3 zombie-themed lesson plans

Posted by Marygrove MAT on Sep 21, 2013 6:00:00 AM

STEMEarlier this week, we shared a zombie-themed writing activity with you and we’re happy to say that there are more zombies where that came from. This morning we came across STEM Behind Hollywood, a cool new resource put together by Texas Instruments.

Here you’ll find three free, Hollywood-inspired math and science activities that model the transmission of a hypothetical zombie contagion.

These activities encourage students to engage with STEM concepts like the exponential growth of a zombie horde and how the growth turns into a characteristic “s” curve from limited resources as the infection begins to spread. Students will learn or review the basic functions of various parts of the human brain and discuss factors dealing with immunity and vaccines.

Unless you can recreate the activities on your own, you’ll need to download the TI-Nspire trial software; the good news is that it’s compatible with iPads and other Texas Instrument hardware like the TI-Nspire.

If you want to take a look at the lesson plan before going through the effort of downloading the software, click here.

 

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Tags: STEM, STEM careers, science teachers, science standards, math teachers, mathematical concepts, zombie lesson plans, mathematics

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