MAT Blog

“Making America…”: Teaching Student Leadership and Responsibility

Posted by Marygrove MAT on Jan 4, 2017 12:10:46 PM

As a “teacher of teachers” at Marygrove College, I am always on the lookout for a good school story.  Don Aslett tells the story of two schools in the same U.S. city.  The first had a lunchroom strewn with trash which took hours to clean every day.  The second school’s janitor needed just 15 minutes.  The schools were as identical as two schools can be, except for different principals.  At the second, the principal required students to clean up their own places.  “Anything you mess up, you clean up,” was the fair, simple rule which “unquestionably taught and reinforced the most important ingredient of greatness: responsibility.”

The recent slogan “Make American Great Again,” made me think.  The last time America was great was when responsibility was something taught at home and school, and the principle of “For the Common Good” was held in mind when leaders of government and industry made decisions, when we said “our children,” rather than “those children” regardless of how well they tested.  So, how about it?  Let’s clean up our own messes and demonstrate to the world that we understand the most important ingredient of greatness: responsibility.  I’ll make you a deal – I’ll teach our teachers how to help our children learn this amazing skill if you will do your part by addressing all forms of inequality at home and abroad.  Deal?

diane_brown.jpgDiane S. Brown, Ph.D., IHM, was appointed the Coordinator for the Academic Department of Marygrove College’s Master in the Art of Teaching program in 2007 and the Director in 2010. She is currently the Chair of Education. Brown’s research interests include student-teacher interactions in the online environment and the use of Currere as a method to retain experienced teachers in the profession.

Tags: student leadership, effective classroom management

Think You Know What Motivates Students? Think Again.

Posted by Ryan O'Rourke on May 5, 2014 10:14:00 AM

Last week, I shared a simple goal-setting strategy I’ve been using over the past few years. As a companion piece, I thought I’d share “The Truth about What Motivates Us,” an animated video adapted from a longer lecture by Daniel Pink. It’s a fascinating piece and was certainly an eye-opener for me.  





New Call to action

Tags: student leadership, Success, intrinsic motivation, student independence, student engagement, student evaluation, goal setting

Keep Students Motivated with This Goal-Setting Activity

Posted by Ryan O'Rourke on May 3, 2014 6:00:00 AM

goal setting activityWhen we were students, often the last week of school was spent watching videos and goofing around. We loved every minute of it, but looking back, it’s easy to see that this was not a productive use of our time.

To keep students motivated and self-reflective, we like to have them complete goal-setting worksheets throughout the year—but you can certainly implement them at any point in the semester, even if you only have a few weeks left of school.

This activity comes from Larry Ferlazzo, but over the years, we've made a few tweaks to the original lesson. Here’s what we do:

Start by having students read an excerpt from Michael Jordan’s book, I Can’t Accept Not Trying. After students finish reading, ask them to pair up with another student and write a one-sentence summary of the information.

Next, students get together with another pair of students to compare their summaries and work together to develop the best one-sentence thesis/summary they possibly can. Once groups finish, we like to have each group write their sentence on the white board. Then, as a class, we review the strengths and weaknesses of each summary and work together as a class to create the most accurate and concise one-sentence summary that we can.

Following this, each student completes this goal-setting worksheet. If this worksheet doesn’t work for you, Worksheet Place has a nice collection of alternatives. 

After completing the worksheet, give students the opportunity to share their goals with their partner. Following this, collect the worksheets, make copies and return their sheets to them the following day. Until the end of the year, we will review student progress each week.

Photo credit: Ulf Bodin / Foter / Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

36 Brain Breaks for Students

Tags: student leadership, Success, intrinsic motivation, student independence, student engagement, student evaluation, goal setting

9 Ways Students Can Develop a Growth Mindset

Posted by Ryan O'Rourke on Apr 14, 2014 11:55:00 AM

Last week, Larry Ferlazzo reblogged a photograph of a growth-mindset chart he came across on Twitter. I liked so much that I decided to reformat it into a printable version. To save, simply right click on the image and "save as."

Growth Mindset






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Tags: student recognition, student leadership, mindfulness in the classroom, mindfulness exercises, student independence, student engagement, motivation, growth mindset

Student Leadership and the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

Posted by Marygrove MAT on Jan 15, 2014 9:19:00 AM

student leadershipWe recently came across an article featuring Muriel Summers, an elementary principal who is perhaps best known for the Leadership Model Program she used to transform A.B Combs Elementary from a struggling school into the number one magnet school in the country.

You can read more about the Leadership Model she used by clicking here, but we’d like to share seven of the basic tenants of the program below. We have a feeling that both students and teachers could benefit from reading them.

Student Leadership and the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

Habit 1: Be proactive
I am a responsible person. I take initiative. I choose my actions, attitudes and moods. I do not blame others for my wrong actions. I do the right thing without being asked, even when no one is looking.

Habit 2: Begin with the End in Mind
I plan ahead and set goals. I do things that have meaning and make a difference. I am an important part of my classroom and contribute to my school’s mission and vision.

Habit 3: Put First Things First
I spend my time on things that are most important. This means I say no to things I know I should not do. I set priorities, make a schedule, and achieve my goals. I am disciplined and organized.

Habit 4:
I balance courage for getting what I want with consideration for what others want. I make deposits in others’ Emotional Bank Accounts. When conflicts arise, I look for third alternatives. I look for ways to be a good citizen.

Habit 5: Seek First to Understand
I listen to other people’s ideas and feelings. I try to see things from their viewpoints. I listen to others without interrupting. I am confident in voicing my ideas. I look people in the eyes when talking.

Habit 6: Synergize
I value other people’s strengths and learn from them. I work well in groups, even with people who are different than me. I seek out other people’s ideas to solve problems because I know that by teaming with others we can create better solutions than can anyone of us alone. I am humble.

Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw
I take care of my body by eating right, exercising, and getting sleep. I spend time with family and friends. I learn in lots of ways and lots of places, not just at school. I take time to find meaningful ways to help others.

If some of Summers’ tenants sound familiar, it may be because they are based off of the 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, a professional development series made popular by best-selling author, Stephen Covey.  

 

service learning guide

Tags: student recognition, student leadership, highly effective people, student independence, student engagement

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